Leading 3,000 children out of slavery: Child activists and their stories

Leading 3,000 children out of slavery: Child activists and their stories

Children should understand injustice and the mechanisms through which it persists. They must able to identify when they or others are mistreated and have the tools to reject it. Most of all, they should know that we all share the responsibility of fixing what is broken and unjust in our world. Here at Camarades Wear, we not only support fashion with a cause, but we like to shed a light on people who share this sentiment: be curious, imaginative and bold.
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Activism isn’t just for adults and teens. Here are some young Activists Who Are Changing the World: 
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Iqbal Masih – Stepping Up Against Abusive Child Labor
Iqbal Masih
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Masih, who was born in Pakistan and was sold into bondage by his family at the age of four to repay a debt. He worked long hours as a carpet weaver until the age 10 when he escaped, was captured and then escaped again for good. He went on to help over 3,000 Pakistani child slaves escape from hard labor and received international recognition for his efforts. His story ended tragically when, at the age of 12, he was fatally shot in his native Pakistan.
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Gavin Grimm - Eqaulity Rights in the Country
Gavin Grimm
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Gavin Grimm is a transgender teenager who was thrust into the national spotlight at 15, when he and the ACLU sued his Virginia school district after he was banned from using the boys’ restroom at his high school. “I’m not really sure how using the bathroom became national news,” he told TIME. “I thought it was a pretty simple concept that could be solved quickly and privately.” His case has gone all the way to the Supreme Court and he has become the face of transgender rights in the U.S. Although he eventually lost the right to be heard at the Supreme Court, his continued fight further points to the inhumanity of those who classify the transgender community as second class citizens.
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Amariyanna “Mari” Copeny - Little Miss Flint
Amariyanna “Mari” Copeny
In 2006, 8-year-old Copeny wrote a letter to President Barack Obama in which she referred to herself as “Little Miss Flint.” In the letter she asked if she could meet with him or the First Lady during an upcoming trip to Washington, D.C. She was heading to the nation’s capital to hear Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder testify before Congress about the water crisis in her hometown of Flint, Michigan.
While her trip to Washington did not end with the meeting she had hoped for, “Little Miss Flint” later received a call from the White House that President Obama had read her letter and was emailing a response. In the letter, Obama explained that he was moved by Copeny’s words and that he hoped to meet her on his upcoming trip to Flint.
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Since that meeting, Copeny has continued her fight for clean water in Flint and has also become a youth ambassador for the Women’s March.
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One is never too young nor too old to stand up against injustice. Activism and action has no age!  
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